WELLY WANGING




THE WELLIES!


MEASURING WHEEL!



 

 
 








 

 

Welly Wanging is easy to play and Hilarious Fun!!!
Mark the Area out first. Put the Coloured Wooden Plank
on the ground (Represents a Farmers Gate) and then space
out the Plastic Cones giving 10 feet Throwing Corridor.
Step up to the Gate and see how far you can 'Wang' (Throw)
your Welly - Furthest distance thrown wins!!!

WELLY WANGING CONSISTS OF:

12x Wellies! (Green)!
Herefordshire Gate Throwing Line (10ft 1Inch Coloured Wooden Plank*)!
Plastic Cones to mark out Throwing Corridor Area!
Measuring Wheel (To measure distances Wellies thrown)!
Little Flags to use as Markers where Wellies
have landed!

*Rules vary in Areas: Welsh Gate (10 Ft), Yorkshire Gate (10Ft)
and Herefordshire Gate (10Ft 1 Inch)!

HIRE PRICE PER DAY: 30.00

TO BOOK: CALL 01981-570645

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WELLY WANGING - HISTORY

WOW! Welly Wanging - What are its Origins? Who really started it - And Where?
The Legend says...Two Farmers had a dispute - Ale was spilt (Thats serious)
by a innocent Bystander on to one of the Farmers - A Welly was thrown -
News spread around the Locals in Upperthong, Holmfirth who then re-enacted
the deadly deed light-heartly for a couple of Weeks - The Legend began - It
somehow turned into a friendly Welly Throwing Competion!!!
(Upperthong - No TV, Computers or Smartphones?)

If your into Wellies? The World Championships and more information
type www.upperthong.org.uk into your Browser!
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Can be spelt as: Welly or Wellie!
Wellington Boots are also known as Rubber Boots, Wellies,
Wellingtons, Topboots, Billy-Boots, Gumboots, Gumbies, Gummies,
Rainboots, Alaskan Sneakers, Kboots and Gum Rubbers!


WELLINGTON BOOT - HISTORY

Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (KG GCB GCH PC FRS)
instructed his Shoemaker, Hoby of St. James's Street, London, to modify the
18th-century Hessian Boot.

The resulting new Boot was fabricated in soft calfskin leather,
had the trim removed and was cut to fit more closely around the leg.
The heels were low cut, stacked around an inch (2.5 centimetres),
and the boot stopped at mid-calf. It was suitably hard-wearing for riding,
yet smart enough for informal Evening Wear.

The Boot was dubbed the 'Wellington' and the name has
stuck in Great Britain ever since!

In the Post-War era the lower cost and ease of rubber
"Wellington" boot manufacture, and it being entirely waterproof
led to many Labours wearing them.

Then slowly they spread to the General Population being
renowned for wearing in 'Wet Weather!'
(Green Wellington Boots were introduced by Hunters in 1955!)

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Golden Valley Inflatables